.

Village Lost 516 Trees to Sandy

More than 50 fell on homes.

Of its extensive 16,000 tree inventory, the village of Garden City lost 516 "mature, beautiful specimens" as a result of Hurricane Sandy, according to recreation director Kevin Ocker.
Of its extensive 16,000 tree inventory, the village of Garden City lost 516 "mature, beautiful specimens" as a result of Hurricane Sandy, according to recreation director Kevin Ocker.
Of its extensive 16,000 tree inventory, the village of Garden City lost 516 "mature, beautiful specimens" as a result of Hurricane Sandy, according to recreation director Kevin Ocker.

While many blocked roadways and took down power lines, 60 landed on village homes. Building superintendent Mike Filippon said none of the affected homes had to be condemned.

"Some look very bad when you see a tree leaning against a house," he said. "However that doesn't mean that home is not habitable ... A few of the homes were bad enough that the residents voluntarily vacated them."

According to Filippon, whose department has received one Sandy-related application for repair as of Friday, an early tally indicated a tree fell on 15 homes in the western section; 11 in the Estates; six in Central; and 25 in the East, an area he said "seemed to take the brunt of damage."

Ocker said his crews worked with contractors to pull trees off houses and then helped Department of Public Works (DPW) crews clear streets. "Supervisors pulled together under extraordinary circumstances," Ocker said, naming Ed Fronckowicz, Sandy Young and Mike Didyk, who fielded anywhere from 700-800 calls from distressed residents during and after the storm.

Without power at the cottages, recreation employees worked out of a call center police commissioner Kenneth Jackson set up for them. "Overall, the experience was excellent," Ocker said.

He added that all the downed trees, mostly oak, have been cut into 11-foot logs that could be sold for approximately $100 per foot.

Village administrator Robert Schoelle said some of the stumps, measuring anywhere from 12 to 44 inches, have four to six-foot root balls attached.

"it was a busy and challenging 18 days," Schoelle said. "We planned for the worst and we were very fortunate to locate six qualified contractors who continue to help us."

According to the village administrator, approximately 700 out-of-state National Grid contractors are temporarily sleeping in the St. Paul's Field House after they return from storm damage restoration in the field. More crews are dorming at the Edgemere Road firehouse, where they'll likely stay through Christmas.

"There's a lot more to do, there really is," he added.

Schoelle said he's reached out to three universities to invite students in the landscape architecture program to use the village as their "palette" so to speak to help Garden City with re-planting efforts following the widespread storm damage.

"I sent letters to the landscape architecture programs at Cornell, Syracuse and City University of New York," Schoelle said, adding he hadn't yet heard a response from anyone as of Friday. "Incidentally both Kevin Ocker and Mike Didyk are Cornell grads."

Students could help with selection of species and more during the planning stages for re-planting on residential streets. "It's a good first start," Schoelle said.
Douglas O'Connor November 19, 2012 at 08:41 AM
In the Mott section it appeared that many of the downed trees were planted in the curb strip- The grassy area between the curb and the sidewalk- Perhaps when replanting the village refrain from planting them there. The oak trees have nowhere for their roots to grow.
Steve F November 19, 2012 at 01:30 PM
The strip between the stree and sidewalk is especially problematic as people replace sidewalks and contractors cut roots out of their way.
Jack O'Niel November 19, 2012 at 04:34 PM
Exactly Doug, that's where most did fall. Smaller trees would be better instead of the 60' monsters that fell like dominoes.
Bill Sweeney November 21, 2012 at 03:40 PM
I would love to see the Village replant trees with better, deeper root systems. Perhaps refer to something like this: http://www.ehow.com/list_7658277_plants-trees-deep-roots.html Also, maybe think about the curb and sidewalk systems. I know the sidewalks are great, but there needs to be a balance, too. The trees really make Garden City. For sure, when the sidewalks are done, the roots CAN NOT be cut.

Boards

More »
Got a question? Something on your mind? Talk to your community, directly.
Note Article
Just a short thought to get the word out quickly about anything in your neighborhood.
Share something with your neighbors.What's on your mind?What's on your mind?Make an announcement, speak your mind, or sell somethingPost something
See more »